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Can't Believe It, Another Rubble Camo Helmet!


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#1 Bugme

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 02:56 PM

When I thought I'd never find another WWII Britiah helmet done in the Maltese rubble camo, I found this one out of Maleiha, Malta.

This particular helmet is done in the typical Rubble Camo pattern, however this one has had sand added to the lighter color. Finding one of these was hard so, I can't believe I found another.

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#2 Bugme

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 03:02 PM

This is from a living history group on Malta that put together a short historical page concerning the rubble camo. They give a great explanation of this camo pattern:
_________________
Malta Camouflage

maltacommand.com

The pattern, which was only used in Malta, had two main variations;
Light vehicles, guns, generators, motorcycles, tanks, etc. which had an irregular outline were painted in a pattern resembling the rubble walls which bordered each and every field. This consisted of shapeless blotches of light stone paint, with a darker colour (dark green or dark brown mostly, but sometimes any dark shade available).

For such a small country, Malta has an amazing wealth of history. Due to its geographical position, Maltas importance in the battle for the Mediterranean and North Africa was inversely proportional to its size!
Malta was awarded the George Cross for not only enduring the heaviest bombing campaign of WW2, but also for taking the fight back to the enemy.

In such a scenario, camouflage was of vital importance for survival. For this reason a camouflage scheme was devised for Malta, and was applied to all equipment destined to be exposed to the enemy. All cars, trucks, motorcycles, field guns, tanks, etc. were given the treatment. Even steel helmets were painted, and not only those used by the services but also those issued to the ARP, the Police, the Public Works, and others.

This would usually be done by hand, and various factors, such as the availability of paint in suitable colours, the ability of the individual entrusted with the job, and his interpretation of the official instructions would all be working against any uniformity of results.

In an effort to further improve the effect, sand was sometimes sprinkled over the freshly-painted surface, especially on steel helmets. This eliminated glinting in the harsh Mediterranean sun, which would often be enough to give away ones position.

#3 Eric Queen

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 04:13 PM

Congrats Scott. Super piece. Something about the "turtle shell" camo's that I just love. 



#4 Bugme

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 08:08 AM

Congrats Scott. Super piece. Something about the "turtle shell" camo's that I just love. 


Yeah, they kinda grow on you.

#5 Scarecrow

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 02:15 PM

Scott,

 

Outstanding helmet!  Quite a rare find.  Just a curiosity question.  Was the sand added to the helmet or was it there and scraped away in spots to form the camo pattern?



#6 Bugme

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 03:27 PM

Scott,
 
Outstanding helmet!  Quite a rare find.  Just a curiosity question.  Was the sand added to the helmet or was it there and scraped away in spots to form the camo pattern?

Looks like the light color was brushed on and while it was still wet, they sprinkled sand on it.

#7 RememberThe5thESB

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 09:31 AM

Heck it doesnt have to be a rubble camo just to be cool, any camo helmet is! Although this one certainly is on the edge compared to others. I dont even collect British militaria but this is still awesome!

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#8 Bugme

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 02:22 PM

Heck it doesnt have to be a rubble camo just to be cool, any camo helmet is! Although this one certainly is on the edge compared to others. I dont even collect British militaria but this is still awesome!


I have had a passing interest in British stuff for years but, never really kept it in the collection long. For whatever reason, these tweak my interest


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