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WW1 Second battle of Gaza killed in action


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#1 Militaria of the Past

Militaria of the Past
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Posted 04 August 2019 - 08:25 PM

I’ve had this small group for about a year. Thought I would share it here since I had not yet.

Private Robert Hogg
Born in Selkirk, Scotland December 30, 1880
Died on April 19, 1917
Private Hogg enlisted April 6, 1915 and served with the 1/4 & 1/5 Kings Own Scottish Borders. He fought at Gallipoli and was killed in action during second Battle of Gaza.
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#2 Allan H.

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 05:13 AM

MOTP,

 

Thank you for posting the War Medal to Pte. Hogg. I have always found the Gallipoli campaign to be fascinating. Here is a good example showing us that Gallipoli wasn't only fought by the ANZAC. I've also always had a soft spot for the KOSBs. I served near them during Desert Shield/ Storm and loved the fact that they wore their glengarries all of the time. I always got a kick out of how uniquely personal the exact position of the cap on the soldier's head who wore it was to each individual. Some would rear the point of the cap clear down on the bridge of their noses, and   some would have their caps on at a jaunty angle.

 

I assume that Pte. Hogg would have been eligible for the trio- Pip, Squeak and Wilfred? Do you have any idea where the others might be?

 

As an aside, I would call out to them "Hey Cosbys!" when I would see them. Others in my unit would look at me funny, back during this time, "The Cosby Show" was a staple of Thursday night television in the US. In the US Army, "Cosby" was au unofficial term used to reflect an "African American" soldier's race as using terms like "negro" or "black" were considered no-nos. I learned later that African American soldiers would often use the term "Cartwright" to reflect that a soldier was Caucasian. Of course the name came from the TV series "Bonanza."

 

Allan



#3 Militaria of the Past

Militaria of the Past
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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:25 AM

MOTP,
 
Thank you for posting the War Medal to Pte. Hogg. I have always found the Gallipoli campaign to be fascinating. Here is a good example showing us that Gallipoli wasn't only fought by the ANZAC. I've also always had a soft spot for the KOSBs. I served near them during Desert Shield/ Storm and loved the fact that they wore their glengarries all of the time. I always got a kick out of how uniquely personal the exact position of the cap on the soldier's head who wore it was to each individual. Some would rear the point of the cap clear down on the bridge of their noses, and   some would have their caps on at a jaunty angle.
 
I assume that Pte. Hogg would have been eligible for the trio- Pip, Squeak and Wilfred? Do you have any idea where the others might be?
 
As an aside, I would call out to them "Hey Cosbys!" when I would see them. Others in my unit would look at me funny, back during this time, "The Cosby Show" was a staple of Thursday night television in the US. In the US Army, "Cosby" was au unofficial term used to reflect an "African American" soldier's race as using terms like "negro" or "black" were considered no-nos. I learned later that African American soldiers would often use the term "Cartwright" to reflect that a soldier was Caucasian. Of course the name came from the TV series "Bonanza."
 
Allan

Unfortunately his other award(s) locations are unknown.


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