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WWII Funeral/Mass Cards, Sterbebild, Show Yours


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3 hours ago, patches said:

That's an interesting one, the only thing I can think of was he was initialy a member of a Sea Plane Detachment aboard one of the Capital Ships, maybe a mechanic on for the planes. Unlike the U.S. Navy and the British Navy who used Navy Aviators for their sea planes aboard these big warships,  the German Navy used Air Force Aviators, and I suppose any other personel in these decrements were Air Force too, yes Goering insisted on it, (Everything that Flies Belongs to Me!) and they wore the Air Force uniforms, curious he wears Navy Whites right.

Could he be a member of the Sea Rescue Service the Seenothilfe? This was a Air force unit they rescued downed pilots and crews on the water, the Channel, North Sea, the Atlantic etc etc, but did they operate Boats???

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On 6/10/2020 at 9:54 PM, patches said:

Could he be a member of the Sea Rescue Service the Seenothilfe? This was a Air force unit they rescued downed pilots and crews on the water, the Channel, North Sea, the Atlantic etc etc, but did they operate Boats???

Someone once mentioned that sometimes Luftwaffe specialized communications or radar operations personnel were temporarily assigned to naval craft in the channel, to assist directing Luftwaffe aircraft in the area.

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23 hours ago, bryang said:

Someone once mentioned that sometimes Luftwaffe specialized communications or radar operations personnel were temporarily assigned to naval craft in the channel, to assist directing Luftwaffe aircraft in the area.

Interesting uniform though right, it looks like a specifically made Blue on White Luftwaffe Sleeve Rank Gull (Unteroffizier), if so why no Luftwaffe breast eagle then, you know to really show his arm.

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On 6/9/2020 at 9:12 PM, Proud Kraut said:

In remembrance

In prayer

of our unforgettable

Hans Urban

son of a border policeman first class in Eschlkam

private and officer candidate

11th Infantry Regiment, 1st Company

who died on February, 13th 1917

in the age of 19 years and 11 months

during a handgranade fight

the hero´s death.

He rests in peace!

Honor his memoriam.

 

Thank you , Sir!!

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...
On 9/18/2020 at 11:20 AM, Garandrew said:

Interesting it has R..I.P. on the bottom. No telling where he was killed, could be Southern France or near the Belgian or Dutch borders at that date, August 31. He was a Armored Engineer in one of the Army Armored Divisions

69634C32-F95B-4F52-9795-C041AA32098C.jpeg

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

A Panzer Späh Soldat, given he was gef in The Netherlands on the first day of the invasion of the west indicates the Austrian 9th Panzer Division's Aufklärungs-Regiment (Motorisiert) 9, it's 2nd or II Battalion, the II Battalion was the one that had Armored Cars. The 9th Panzer Division redesignated from the 4. Leichten Division (4th Light Division) and was in the German 18th Army, 18th Army goes into The Netherlands. Niedermeier was from Neumarkt-Sankt Veit in Upper Bavaria, and since this division, the 4th Light/9th Panzer Division was Austrian means that despite this it took in German other ranks, maybe from Bavaria only, not sure.

mass 2nd light div a 70001.jpg

mass 20001.jpg

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Another early was gef, a Gebirgsjäger, seeing where he is from, Oberhochstätt, which is in the Bavarian Alps, and where he was killed, Lemberg (Lvov)was probably in the 1st Mountain Division.  1st Mountain Division was in Army Group South and fought in Lemberg. His first name is Max by the way, ( Lars, Bitte, Was Bedeutet Brandhuberbauer?)

card.jpg

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I only know the last name "Brandhuber". Seems to be a composition, translated Brandhuber farmer´s son.

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7 hours ago, Proud Kraut said:

I only know the last name "Brandhuber". Seems to be a composition, translated Brandhuber farmer´s son.

Thanks Lars, hmm could Brandhuber be the name of a farm, the farm owned by a local family in or near Oberhochstätt named Brandhuber?

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8 hours ago, Proud Kraut said:

Yes Patches, that would be my guess.

Yes something only or mostly local folks would know, they would know, his father worked there.

 

Something similar in your reply on the Gebirgsjaeger Herman Viehhauser on the previous page, Baurensohn zu Oberpoint, Oberpoint will be known by the locals in this area. they'd be familiar with it.

 

Herman Viehhauser. Oberpoint is most likely the name of the farmyard. Very common in Austria. I found one Oberpoint as a part/farmyard of the village Opponitz in Lower Austria.

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  • 8 months later...
3 hours ago, patches said:

 A Policemam, who is from or near Munich, he was killed near Lake Ilmen in North Russia, Army Group North.

Cai.PNG

And here's a current page on the cemetery in Russia were he is.

 

 

GOOGLE THIS.

 

Soldaten Friedhof in Korostyn | Flickr

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
On 4/22/2020 at 5:43 PM, patches said:

A interesting one I found, a Policeman, died of wounds in Yugoslavia. partisan actions we would have to guess.

gef.jpg

Lets repost this card so we dont lose it.

Crecard.PNG

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  • 2 weeks later...

I started collecting a few "Death Cards" that relate to the Italian Campaign.  I created a webpage to introduce readers to this bit of history.  My goal was to find a German soldier who fought ---and died--- during the part of the Italian Campaign when my father was serving.  It is usually difficult to know their unit because that was seldom listed on the card. 

  Later, I had someone contact me who could research where each of them died.  One of them presented a problem as there were two soldiers who had the same name and approx same age & rank who were buried at Cassino. 

 

Link:  German Death Cards

Here area a few from my small collection.

 

 Unterofficer Siegfried Ebner  was a member of the Luftwaffe Field Division, which was an infantry unit that was part of the air force.  He died on 27 June 1944.  There were two Luftwaffe Field Divisions in Italy--19th and 20th.   The 19th Luftwaffe Field Division took a stand at Cecina, just north of Rome on the western coast, and fought until their unit was killed or captured.  This would match up with the date of his death.  
Note---Siegfried's photo shows him wearing a Wehrmacht uniform and not the Luftwaffe uniform.  Some of the NCO's in the Luftwaffe Field Division were brought from the Wehrmacht.  

478279945_cardSiegfriedEbner.jpg.0031adbd9db1907bb346828100e44d73.jpg

 

This "Death Card" of Lt. Karl Reuss is not typical as it does not have a photo and is printed on one side on plain paper.  The fold in the paper is noticeable.  I obtained this one because he was German artillery officer in Italy and he was killed in May of 1944, when my Dad first entered combat.  This 24-year old Officer earned the Iron Cross 1st Class and 2nd Class, and a wound medal, as  well as a campaign medal for fighting in Russia.  He definitely had combat experience.  It would be interesting to know the identify of his unit and exactly where in Italy he served in relation to where my Dad was located.  He was buried in Pomezia, Block Q, Grave 398.

201923163_CardLt.KarlReus.JPG.901eded8986c81cfa205550e6f152d76.JPG

 

 

Pvt. Franz Dullinger was another soldier serving in an Artillery Regiment---like my father.  He wears a patch of a radio operator.  He was a decorated soldier who was killed in action on September 5, 1944, during the heavy fighting at the Gothic Line.  Private Dullinger was 31 years old.  He was buried in Pomezia, Block 23, Grave 20.   

1082626657_CardFranzDullinger.jpg.5d2085755e6c7b7ee36b9c4b63e9bd92.jpg

 

 

Sometimes the cards have poem written in old Germanic language which is hard to translate.  The poem on Dullinger's card reads:

 

You have fought with the enemy
under the highest tension of the battle.
But now, you suffer nevermore,
being redeemed by the hero's death.
You eyes are closed for eternal rest,
your restless hands are quiet now,
extinguished is your meek view,
your life was of short fortune.  
Your dearest ones are crying,
untold is all their pain,
cause your lovely, caring heart
doesn't beat for them no more.

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kristoffer

Nice cards Custermen.

 

I also have a few "Italian" cards. Will try and find them. Sicily, Fallschirmjäger etc

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  • 4 weeks later...

This must be another example of a 1950s one, see how his division is mentioned, the 100. Leichte Division, something  not seen on the wartime cards, and the fact he died as a POW, captured at Stalingrad. That he was in this division makes him an Austrian, and indeed, Sankt Radegund.

german-death-card-soldier-100th light div.jpg

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